Writers in Progress Instructors

Dori Ostermiller, MFA, is the founding director of Writers in Progress.  Her debut novel, Outside the Ordinary World (MIRA, 2010) was an Indie Best pick and an MLA must-read.  Her work has appeared in many literary journals, including The Bellingham Review, Alligator Juniper, Bellowing Ark, Peregrine, Calliope, Roanoke Review, Chautauqua Literary Journal, The American, The Massachusetts Review and Rumpus, among others. Dori has worked for over two decades as a professional editor, and has taught literature and writing at many area colleges and universities. She is the recipient of a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist’s Fellowship and a Tobias Wolf Fiction award, among others.


Emily Lackey is Writers in Progress’s Assistant Director. Her stories and essays have been published in Glimmer Train, Prairie Schooner, Post Road, The Literary Review, Longreads, The Rumpus, Green Mountains Review, and The Huffington Post, among others. She was a fellow at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and an artist-in-residence at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts and Newnan ArtRez. After receiving her MFA from the University of New Hampshire, she taught writing at the University of New Hampshire and in the graduate writing program at Southern New Hampshire University.   Find out more at http://www.emilylackey.com


Jacqueline Sheehan, PhD is the New York Times bestselling author of The Comet’s Tale, Lost & Found, Now & Then, Picture This, The Center of the World, and The Tiger in the House. She writes NPR commentaries, travel articles, and essays including the New York Times column, “Modern Love.” She edited the anthology, Women Writing in Prison. Jacqueline teaches workshops at Grub Street in Boston and around the world. Find out more at http://www.jacquelinesheehan.com/


Randy Susan Meyers is the author of five novels: The Murderer’s Daughters (a finalist for the Massachusetts Book Award), The Comfort of LiesAccidents of MarriageThe Widow of Wall Street, and recently, the critically acclaimed, Waisted. Meyers lives in Boston and teaches writing at Grub Street and Writers in Progress. Find out more at https://www.randysusanmeyers.com/


Tzivia Gover is the author of The Mindful Way to a Good Night’s Sleep and Joy in Every Moment. She is a writer, educator, and certified dream therapist and the director of the Institute of Dream Studies. Gover has led numerous workshops and panels about dreams, mindfulness, and writing, and she holds an MFA in writing from Columbia University. She is an active member of the International Association for the Study of Dreams and the founder of 350 Dreamers, an international network of people who dream together for global healing. Find out more at http://tziviagover.com/


Cathy Luna, PhD has published excerpts from Missing Lessons, hermemoir-in-progress, in Lunch TicketCONSEQUENCE, and The River Teeth Journal.  A former  faculty member at UMass Amherst, Cathy has taught writing for more than thirty years. Since 2010, she has been a writing consultant and writing coach for Five College faculty writers.


Kenneth R. Rosen, a finalist for both the Livingston Award for international reporting and the Bayeux-Calvados Award for War Correspondents, won a Clarion Award in 2018 for his reporting from Iraq. He is a senior news assistant at The New York Times, a Robert Novak Fellow, a senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism, and a 2018 John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Justice Reporting Fellow. His first book is forthcoming from Little A in 2020. Find out more at https://www.kennethrrosen.com/


Emily Nagoski is the award-winning  author of the New York Times bestsellers, Come As You Are, and Burnout, about women’s sexuality and wellbeing. She began her work as a sex educator at the University of Delaware, where she volunteered as a peer sex educator while studying psychology. She went on to earn a M.S. in Counseling and a Ph.D. in Health Behavior, both from Indiana University, with clinical and research training at the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. After eight years working at Smith College, Emily is now a full-time writer. She writes and teaches at Writers in Progress. Find out more at http://www.emilynagoski.com/


Susanne Dunlap is the author of seven historical novels for adults and teens. Her young adult novel The Musician’s Daughter was a Junior Library Guild selection and a Bankstreet Children’s Book of the Year, and it was nominated for the Missouri Gateway Readers Prize and the Utah Book AwardHer latest novel, Listen to the Wind, is the first volume of a medieval trilogy for adults, The Orphans of Tolosa. Susanne earned her PhD in music history from Yale, is a Smith College graduate, and lives and writes in Northampton, Massachusetts with her partner Charles and her beloved dog Betty. Find out more at http://www.susanne.susanne-dunlap.com/


Pamela Marin has been a staff writer at the Orange County Register and a columnist for The Tribeca Tribune. An essay she wrote for Ladies’ Home Journal was featured on “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” She’s the author of a memoir, Motherland (Free Press, 2005), and wrote the movie Tommy’s Honour, which won Scotland’s BAFTA for Best Feature Film in 2017.


Emily Everett is managing editor of The Common, a biannual literary magazine publishing stories, essays, poems, and images with a modern sense of place. With other editors, she selects pieces for the magazine, and edits and develops that work with authors prior to publication. Her fiction is forthcoming in The Kenyon Review and Electric Lit, and has appeared in Tin House and The Tishman Review. Her nonfiction appears online for The Common and Take Magazine. She studied Literature at Smith College and Queen Mary University of London. Find out more at https://www.emily-everett.com/


Meghan Nesmith’s work has appeared in numerous print and digital publications, including Teen Vogue, Bon Appetit, the Globe and Mail, the Guardian, Man Repeller, and more. A former editor for The Billfold, she has also worked as a content strategist and consultant for brands such as Spotify and Slack. She received her MFA from American University and now lives in Boston, where she is at work on a novel.


Sarah Earle is a lecturer at the University of New Hampshire, where she teaches first-year composition and a variety of English as a Second Language classes.  She has also taught Creative Nonfiction at St. Paul’s Academic Summer Program in Concord, NH. She holds her MFA in nonfiction writing from UNH; you can read her essays in Bayou Magazine and The Cobalt Review, and her stories in The Rumpus and The Carolina Quarterly.